RequestAPrint on NCIS

Images from the Navy Art Collection will soon be on the set of the hit TV show, NCIS, starring Mark Harmon. The images featured are reproductions of Morgan Ian Wilbur works: “USS Cornado Rides A Sparkling Sea”, “Naval Air Over Korea”, “Steam For Speed”, and “Turnin’ & Burnin’”.

The episode will be shot from March 7th through March 18th. Keep an eye out for the upcoming season that will feature these pieces as set props!

Bonhomme Richard vs. Serapis: US Navy Art Collection

“Bonhomme Richard vs. Serapis” by Anton Otto Fischer. US Navy Art Collection.

During the American Revolution, the U.S. ship Bonhomme Richard, commanded by John Paul Jones, wins a hard-fought engagement against the British ships of war Serapis and Countess of Scarborough, off the eastern coast of England.

Scottish-born John Paul Jones first sailed to America as a cabin boy and lived for a time in Fredericksburg, Virginia, where his brother had a business. He later served on slave and merchant ships and proved an able seaman. After he killed a fellow sailor while suppressing a mutiny, he returned to the American colonies to escape possible British prosecution. With the outbreak of the American Revolution in 1775, he traveled to Philadelphia and was commissioned a senior lieutenant in the new Continental Navy. He soon distinguished himself in actions against British ships in the Bahamas, the Atlantic Ocean and the English Channel.

The piece above is by Anton Otto Fischer and is available for custom reproduction on RequestAPrint.

In August 1779, Jones took command of the Bonhomme Richard and sailed around the British Isles. On September 23, the Bonhomme Richard engaged the Serapis and the smaller Countess of Scarborough, which were escorting the Baltic merchant fleet. After inflicting considerable damage to the Bonhomme Richard, Richard Pearson, the captain of the Serapis, asked Jones if he had struck his colors, the naval signal indicating surrender. From his disabled ship, Jones replied, “I have not yet begun to fight,” and after three more hours of furious fighting it was the Serapis and Countess of Scarborough that surrendered. After the victory, the Americans transferred to the Serapis from the Bonhomme Richard, which sank the following day.

Jones was hailed as a great hero in France, but recognition in the United States was somewhat belated. He continued to serve the United States until 1787 and then served briefly in the Russian navy before moving to France, where he died in 1792 amidst the chaos of the French Revolution. He was buried in an unmarked grave. In 1905, his remains were located under the direction of the U.S. ambassador to France and then escorted back to the United States by U.S. warships. His body was later enshrined in a crypt at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.

To order you’re own custom print of this piece visit RequestAPrint. 

(Information Credit: history.com)